Using over-beaten abaca to paint pebbled rocks for my seascape painting of the Cape Ann coastline.

The finished painting. Cape Ann Shoreline, 2020. Mixed media painting.

A look inside my pulp painting studio

My palette is a combination of recycled plastic cups-yogurt, cottage cheese, pretzel containers (of course I only buy pretzels for use in my studio), glue, spray bottles, and old rags. Delights my frugal heart to reuse so many throw-aways.

#megblackstudios #boston #paperart #handmadepaper #supportlocalartists #papermaking #paperart #newenglandartist #artforsale #shoplocal #papermaker #riverroad #topsfieldma #coolidgeestate #framedart #supportlocalartists

Small Business Saturday, Saturday, November 28, 2020.

Alas, Small Business Saturday will have to wait until next year, 2021. Stay safe and enjoy Thanksgiving with your friends and family.

If you are working from home, why not purchase art in your home office design?

According to the researchers at Stanford University (so you know they must be right) the work from home economy is here to stay. Given these statistics, why not include the purchase of art in your home office design (ok, dining room table, spare bedroom, former man cave)?
I’ve included several samples of available art to imagine just how jazzed your space can look. I have more on my original works gallery, and print gallery.


There is a two week free trial period to test out a piece in your space-sort of like what those fancy rug companies do-so there is no up front cost to consider. Payment plans are available for larger pieces. Send me an email if you’d like to try out one of the works featured, and as always, take care and be well.


Thank you for your support.
Meg

https://megblack.com/galleries/rocks-and-water-as-portrait-of-lifes-journey/
Hever Castle Courtyard, Sussex, England. Framed. 48 x 39 inches.
June Morning Light, in-situ
Distant Travels, Cape Cod National Seashore

Join me, Thursday, August 20, IG Live, 4:00 PM, EST. How to add “water” to a pulp painting.

https://www.instagram.com/megblackstudios/

I will demonstrate my pulp painting technique for adding water imagery to the painting. I’ll discuss the materials and process I use to make the water shimmer and flow. These are some of my most coveted trade secrets so you won’t want to miss it! Post your questions in the question box and I’ll happily answer them. See you at 4:00 EST. Videos are available on IG TV after each session.

Join me for IG Live, Thursday, July 30: mounting the background armature.

https://www.instagram.com/megblackstudios/

Join me for IG Live, 4:00 EST

https://www.instagram.com/megblackstudios/

Follow me as I paint the sea: an explanation of the medium I use.

The painting as of August, 7, 2020.

At first glance, my paintings appear to be oil on canvas or similar. It is upon closer inspection that viewers observe the textured surface of the work. In fact, the most common comment I receive is “I love the texture of your work-it is so engaging. It’s like I’m actually there. Just what is the medium?” The medium I use is abaca, an extremely strong fiber from the inner bark of the banana tree and is used for marine cordage and sails for sailing vessels.

In the 16th century, Venetian artists-Venice at the time was a powerful seafaring nation state-began using the canvases of sailing vessels as surfaces to apply their paints. These canvases were made from durable fibers such as linen, flax and abaca.  It is for this reason that these now famous works have survived to us through the ages. 

Using these same fibers, I have embellished on this idea and created an actual painting method that is just as durable and permanent, and pigmented with light-fast colors to match the rich hues of nature.

My process provides a textured, almost three-dimensional quality to the painting’s surface, thus mimicking nature in all its splendor . . . from its rocky crevices along the ocean shoreline, subtle shadows in a garden path, the fullness and detail of a treed landscape, and the smooth surface of a still lake.  

Natural fibers, beaten into thick coats of pigmented pulp, provides the perfect media with which to create these modern interpretations of representational art.  

painting detail showing texture.

Follow me as I paint the rocky shores of New England

Last month I shared the beginnings of this seascape painting, inspired by the rocky Cape Ann seacoast, a beautiful stretch of beach just north of Boston. As of today, this is how the still in-progress painting appears. I anticipate it will be completed by mid August, so keep following me as I continue to feature it in upcoming blog posts.


I have been posting daily updates on its progress-a few photos are enclosed below (I know, why didn’t I quit after June 25)? One of my favorite things about sharing my progress are the questions I get from followers on InstagramTwitter, and Facebook:How do you do this?What materials do you use?Are you kidding me, you “paint” with a turkey baster?Shut up! You’re just copying over a photograph (the sculptor Rodin suffered a similar fate, so I figure I’m in good company here). 


For the next few weeks, I will share my painting process on Instagram Live, for everyone who wants to learn more about how I paint with pulp.
And don’t forget, this painting will be featured in a Podcast hosted by Helen Heibart to a world-wide audience. My fifteen minutes are here at last!!
For updates on Instagram Live sessions, follow me at https://www.instagram.com/megblackstudios/

The painting on July, 3, 2020 . . .
. . . and June 25, 2020.
I have been painting the north shore of Boston for years. Here are samples of my other paintings, available as originals and giclee prints.
Northshore Scape I (above)
Resilience

For all of my original works and giclee prints, visit my gallery.

Sincerely,

Meg

I will be featured on the Sunday Paper Podcast

I am happy to announce I will be featured on an upcoming podcast for the Sunday Paper, a weekly newsletter for pulp painters and papermakers. The Sunday Paper is published each Sunday by Helen Hiebart Studio.

I will be interviewed in August and the podcast will be available in the Fall. Check back for updates.